Jupiter is the Oldest Planet in the Solar System

Jupiter is the Oldest Planet in the Solar System

Jupiter is not only the biggest planet in the Solar System. A new study of astronomers from Laurence Livermore’s Californian Laboratory, and the University of Munster in Germany, defines Jupiter as the oldest planet in the solar system, Space.com reports. The new analysis of the Planet calculates that the core of Jupiter was 20 times larger than the Earth only 1 million years after the formation of the Sun. This is a fairly short time because young stars usually throw a lot of energy in their first years, which is enough to blow dust and gas to prevent the formation...
Belts Zones of Jupiter Are Disappearing

Belts Zones of Jupiter Are Disappearing

Something’s wrong with Jupiter. Photos by astronomer Antony Wesley shows that one of the two dark areas in the planet’s atmosphere (the belts) has disappeared. Maybe Arthur Clark was right in his Odyssey and the gas giant would become a star to bring life to its companion Europa? The answer is no, because this phenomenon has happened before – it is called “violation in the southern equatorial belt” and occurs in intervals between 3 and 15 years. The brown-red streaks in Jupiter’s atmosphere are due to sulfur and phosphorus mixed with ammonia crystals at a temperature of about 100 degrees...